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How To Optimize Open Rates

How To Optimize Open Rates

  It should be no mystery what the most important thing is when it comes to email marketing campaigns: getting people to read them. According to statistics, 55% of people don’t open their e-mails regularly: So when they do check, they focus on the emails that are worth reading. You may have precisely the product your customers need and you may offer the best prices, but if they aren’t reading your emails and acting on them, then none of that really matters. So how do you get people to read emails? Subject Line The first thing would obviously be the subject line. As we mentioned: people will read what they want to read, when they want to read it, so it’s important that your subject line makes customers want to read the content. In terms of what they subject line says, remember that the point is for people to read your email, which will then inform them about your product and offers. The best advice here is to tell them what the email is about in the subject line, don’t try to sell it to them. Telling them allows them to decide if they are interested in your offer, while trying to sell to them immediately might deter them from reading altogether. The ideal subject line will be: short and to the point. six to ten words, or 50 characters or less. free FROM CAPS and multiple exclamation marks!!! (Caps and exclamations can get filtered out as spam and they come off as a bit aggressive). Optimise for mobile It’s important to remember just how important mobile devices are...
Relating to People Through Surveys

Relating to People Through Surveys

Whether you’re creating personas or trying to get ideas to update your product, surveys are an important tool to use. Surveys will let you talk to customers directly and get input about their needs and interests without having to make assumptions or guesses. But what makes a good survey? How do you create a survey that people want to fill? Why, why, why? The most crucial thing that you need to define is the objective, and there are two things to remember: You have to know what your main objective of the survey is. What are you going to use the information for? Why do you want to know this information about your customers? Keep this objective in mind when you formulate all of your questions. All your questions should be designed to help you achieve your goal, whether it be directly or indirectly. If it’s not related to your goal, it’s not going to help. Leading Questions Perhaps the trickiest and most essential thing to remember throughout the entire survey is to make sure that you don’t ask any leading questions. These are questions that encourage people to respond one way or another. Asking people “Is X the best Y?… Would you say that X is reliable?…” or many other questions that immediately label something as good or bad within the question are all leading questions. It may sound simple, but you’d be surprised at how easy it is to create a leading question without knowing it. One Idea In designing your questions, you have to be careful that each question covers only one idea at a time....
How to Write & Use Personas

How to Write & Use Personas

According to research, 61% of consumers say they feel better about, and are more likely to buy from, a company that delivers custom content. Creating a persona, and knowing how to interact with it will be an investment that will make your marketing more efficient and lead to better customer relations. So what are the steps to creating the right personas? Research The goal of your research is to find patterns in behaviors, expectations, motivations, interests and goals of your target audience. It is important to continue until you find a repeating pattern of responses. Surveys and interviews are essential. Because of their vested interest in both the business and the consumer, you should interview business stakeholders who frequently interact with users. You should also check existing market research and interview market research specialists for advice. Lastly, remember that informal conversations are also very useful. It may not be formal research, but the important thing is to gather information. Anything from 30 minutes to an hour should give you adequate information as long as you stay on topic. What sort of questions should you ask? For building personas, a lot of the questions will likely be indirectly related to your product. Ask things such as “What aspects do you enjoy about your job? What sort of things frustrate you? What would make your job or life at home easier?” Since it all depends on the industry you’re in and the product you’re offering, the possibilities are endless. But it’s essential to remember that questions should be personal and tell you about behaviors, interests, etc while at the same time...
How to Rebound from a Bounce Code

How to Rebound from a Bounce Code

You’ve heard of the Napoleonic Code or the Da Vinci Code… but how important is a Bounce Code? Well, for e-mail marketing these codes are very important. Essentially, a bounce is an e-mail that cannot be delivered. It has been rejected or bounced back to you from the e-mail server. Each rejection has a code associated with it – the bounce code. Sometimes negative metrics can be as helpful as positive ones: Understanding bounce codes will allow your marketing campaigns to be more effective and give you an indication about the cleanliness of your data. A Crash Course on Codes E-mail servers communicate through different codes that mean the same thing to all servers. These codes are either three straight digits (123) called Simple Mail Transfer Protocol (SMTP) or digits separated by periods (1.2.3) called Extended SMTP (ESMTP). 7Sheep will report on SMTP codes, which are used more traditionally. We’re going to focus on these here. Lower numbers in the 200 and 300 range tend to be less important for us because they mean things like: 252 – Cannot Verify user, will attempt delivery later 354 – Start message input and end with . (which simply indicates that the server is ready to accept the message) For e-mail marketing purposes we need two sets of codes. Soft Bounce – The 400s (Temporary Errors) These errors mean that the system ran into some technical problem during delivery (server is down, inbox is full, message is too big, etc). This can happen due to delays or smaller issues occurring when the systems communicate with one another, but it doesn’t mean that...
Getting People to Talk About Themselves

Getting People to Talk About Themselves

How much information do people disclose on forms? That is the question that two researchers from the University of Cambridge and University College London sought to answer. Their research finds that 25% of web claim to have entered false data into forms, and their name is the most frequent item that they lie about. So what’s the upshot of their study? The most important thing to keep in mind in terms of marketing can be summarized by one brief statement in the study “It can be helpful to frame data collection as a social exchange rather than an economic exchange.” Privacy Economics Privacy economics is a field that analyzes how people make decisions about their privacy. In it, there’s a traditional assumption that people will generally fill as few fields as possible because 1) they want to reduce invasion of privacy, and 2) they want to put as little effort into typing as possible. This makes sense. It explains why Autofill has been around since 1997 to help people enter personal information without having to type it. But as internet forms become more prevalent, there has been a rising concern for privacy. So is it true that people fill in as few fields as possible? Well, if this assumption makes perfect sense, then the findings by these authors might surprise you. Fields and Incentives In general, their findings suggest that people will complete fields even when they are marked as optional. This shouldn’t make sense according to the aforementioned assumption because they are putting more effort to tell you more about themselves. Why? According to their findings, it’s because...

The Gif that Keeps on Giving

Anyone who has used the internet over the past few years has surely encountered gifs, particularly animated gifs, whether they realize it or not. Sometimes these are simple animations to make a website more lively instead of being static and dull, other times they are clips from famous shows or movies that most people would be able to relate to. But can these be used for marketing? The answer is an emphatic “yes.” Regardless of the situation, gifs can help you be more personable and there’s a gif for everything. Why The first and most important thing to keep in mind when using gifs is remembering one thing: emotion. Believe it or not, using gifs for communication and marketing has a lot to do with emotional intelligence and answering the question *“which emotion am I trying to communicate?”* Emotional Intelligence is understanding how emotions work both in yourself and in others in order to communicate properly. Gifs allow you to do this because they are infinitely more personable and can leave less room for misinterpretation than other forms of communicating. If a picture says a thousand words, and a gif is a compilation of images, then you really need to think about using gifs in your marketing campaigns. Lastly, use them because they are catchy. Websites and messages become more lively through gifs because there is motion that catches the reader’s eye and makes a website or e-mail look more exciting. When the reader engages with your message more as a conversation than an advertisement, it can have potentially huge rewards. For example, Dell increased their conversion rate by...