US +1 650 600 3955 | EU +43 720 115 215 office@7sheep.net
How to Write & Use Personas

How to Write & Use Personas

According to research, 61% of consumers say they feel better about, and are more likely to buy from, a company that delivers custom content. Creating a persona, and knowing how to interact with it will be an investment that will make your marketing more efficient and lead to better customer relations. So what are the steps to creating the right personas? Research The goal of your research is to find patterns in behaviors, expectations, motivations, interests and goals of your target audience. It is important to continue until you find a repeating pattern of responses. Surveys and interviews are essential. Because of their vested interest in both the business and the consumer, you should interview business stakeholders who frequently interact with users. You should also check existing market research and interview market research specialists for advice. Lastly, remember that informal conversations are also very useful. It may not be formal research, but the important thing is to gather information. Anything from 30 minutes to an hour should give you adequate information as long as you stay on topic. What sort of questions should you ask? For building personas, a lot of the questions will likely be indirectly related to your product. Ask things such as “What aspects do you enjoy about your job? What sort of things frustrate you? What would make your job or life at home easier?” Since it all depends on the industry you’re in and the product you’re offering, the possibilities are endless. But it’s essential to remember that questions should be personal and tell you about behaviors, interests, etc while at the same time...
What is a Persona?

What is a Persona?

What is a persona? Using personas for email campaigns has been shown to double open rates and increase click through rates by 5x, which is testimony to their usefulness. Interestingly enough, a persona could be defined as a personalization of a generalization. By looking at individual customers, finding patterns among them, and grouping these customers based on their similarities, companies set the groundwork for a persona. The last step is simply going back to the individual after various groups have been defined. Creating one personality out of each group allows the interactions between a company and its target audience to become more personal. Instead of trying to cater to an average customer, personas allow for multiple types of customers to arise in order to account for the different interests, motivations and behaviors.   What’s the risk of skipping personas? If you’re not using personas, then you’re doing it wrong, and there’s one all-encompassing reason why: unless you sell one version of one product, there’s probably no such thing as an ‘average customer.’ People have different needs, interests, motivations and aspirations. By having one marketing plan based on one generalization about what your customers are looking for, you would be sacrificing a lot of sales. For example, if you sell clothing and don’t account for the difference between a businessman, a hipster, and a fashionista when you send your “50% OFF SALE” email campaign, chances are your message won’t resonate with any of them. Personas are the best way of avoiding this situation by ensuring that your message reaches the average businessman and the average fashionista instead of just the...
How to Rebound from a Bounce Code

How to Rebound from a Bounce Code

You’ve heard of the Napoleonic Code or the Da Vinci Code… but how important is a Bounce Code? Well, for e-mail marketing these codes are very important. Essentially, a bounce is an e-mail that cannot be delivered. It has been rejected or bounced back to you from the e-mail server. Each rejection has a code associated with it – the bounce code. Sometimes negative metrics can be as helpful as positive ones: Understanding bounce codes will allow your marketing campaigns to be more effective and give you an indication about the cleanliness of your data. A Crash Course on Codes E-mail servers communicate through different codes that mean the same thing to all servers. These codes are either three straight digits (123) called Simple Mail Transfer Protocol (SMTP) or digits separated by periods (1.2.3) called Extended SMTP (ESMTP). 7Sheep will report on SMTP codes, which are used more traditionally. We’re going to focus on these here. Lower numbers in the 200 and 300 range tend to be less important for us because they mean things like: 252 – Cannot Verify user, will attempt delivery later 354 – Start message input and end with . (which simply indicates that the server is ready to accept the message) For e-mail marketing purposes we need two sets of codes. Soft Bounce – The 400s (Temporary Errors) These errors mean that the system ran into some technical problem during delivery (server is down, inbox is full, message is too big, etc). This can happen due to delays or smaller issues occurring when the systems communicate with one another, but it doesn’t mean that...