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Two maps that show why you need to localise your campaigns

We’re really happy at 7Sheep that we offer people the option to localise campaigns/surveys/forms by letting you present landing pages and forms in different language versions (but store your data in the same place!). Localisation is an important and fastgrowing trend with online campaigns, so – combine some great information on second languages and throw in some pretty maps, and you’ve hooked me! Business Insider has an article “The Second Language of Every Part of the World in One Incredible Infographic” and incredible it really is. And fascinating. Especially when looking outside of the US it shows some astounding languages and trends which shouldn’t be overlooked for marketing campaigns. The infographic is originally from https://www.movehub.com. Some of the data was really new to me and could seriously impact where you spend time and budget on a campaign – Polish being the largest second language in the UK or Turkish in Austria surprised me (If asked I would have guessed Urdu and English). The part I really liked about this infographic is illustrated above -the most popular global second languages by countries. We currently support 6/10 of these languages, having recently added the Russian alphabet as an option, and plan to support 8/10 when we have launched our Right To Left alphabet layout options (and, of course, for me seeing Kurdish coming in 7th made me smile). And we’ve recently learnt quite a bit from these great maps by Jakub Marian too: Map of the percentage of people speaking English in the EU by Country. The biggest take away for us from this is that in Austria we really are...

Generating incredible statistics from Facebook for free!

Psychographic statistics via Facebook are something which I’ve blogged about before. I first learnt how to use this nifty tool from Mike Kujawski’s site on public sector marketing almost 3 years ago. Mike showed how to get the statistics back then with a short tutorial but a lot has changed over the last 3 years so here’s how you can leverage the Facebook advertising feature (note! you don’t have to buy any advertsing to get them!) to generate statistics that could be useful to you. Note! You need to have a Facebook Page in order to be able to create these. Step 1: Getting to the menus In the top right hand side of your Facebook account click on the arrow: From this drop down list, select ‘Create adverts’ Step 2: Getting to the statistics From here, select what type of advert you would like to create. I select Boost Your Posts: Then select from which page and which post you’d like to promote. For the purpose of just generating statistics, it really doesn’t matter which post you choose. Step 3: Extremely easy – SCROLL ON THROUGH! You don’t need to set up an account to get your statistics. Scroll on past that section! Step 4: Playing around with parameters You can play around with this – and it’s astonishing at what level you can drill down to. Especially with the demographics and interests. Step 5: Your statistics Whenever you change something in your parameters the barometer on the right hand side will change to reflect the total potential reach of your audience. For 7Sheep, I went for the...

The ‘least techie as possible’ guide to regional settings

After Mike’s blog about importing data, I got a couple of questions about changing regional settings for Excel files. So, I thought I’d talk you through it. Clearly if you have an iota more skill with a computer than I do, then you don’t need to read any further… for those of you on my level, I hope it helps! (A HUGE caveat before we start – you can import into 7Sheep with an Excel sheet using any regional setting, please don’t panic!) Why does it matter? Regional settings define more than just language. It also defines data formats – from dates to numbers. So what? So it can cause problems. About a year ago, whilst testing a new import function with 7Sheep we realised that we had a problem. Mario could import data, Mike could import the same file and me? I couldn’t. We made sure that I had the latest version of the browser (although that didn’t matter), we changed browsers and still had no luck. A bit of research later – we realised it was because I was using a UK regional setting for my computer and Mike and Mario were using Austrian. But why do I even need to think about this? Imagine how we interpret a table of data: The lines between each column or row tell us where one starts and another one ends. A line is a visual default list separator for a table which tells us how to read it. For importing and exporting data your computer programs needs these separators too, they just don’t use lines. And here’s the crux of the issue: Different regional...

Why we let you import from Excel files

Our clients have contact databases with thousands of contacts and more. Therefore it has always been very important for us to improve the import and export of our client’s data in and out of 7Sheep. And with some huge files it has been difficult to find the perfect solution. In the early days we supported the CSV text files (comma-separated values) as everybody else in the industry does. We assumed that as this was standard and we didn’t see other choices that this must be the correct way, no? No it was not! Importing and exporting data in CSV is very problematic with a whole host of issues: Text with paragraphs break the file format and cannot be imported again afterwards. Not only that, the file format itself is not defined explicitly. The workaround is to rely on the standard settings of Microsoft Excel. A painful discovery and a not very well known fact is that the standard settings of Microsoft Excel differ from region to region which can totally mess up your import! To change the setting you have to go to the Windows Control Panel or the System Preferences on the Mac and change it there. Very user friendly. It was clear from the beginning there was no way we would ask our users to do this nor present them with a dialog to define these parameters during import. We are big fans of open file formats (which CSV would be) but if it’s complicated for our users we choose the simple way. And that simple solution is the Microsoft Excel native file format XLS. No problems...