US +1 650 600 3955 | EU +43 720 115 215 office@7sheep.net

3 reasons to make a word cloud out of your website

I’ll let you in on a secret. For the last few years I’ve always roughly gauged websites, and have successfully done this with clients too, by creating word clouds from their URLs. It is a rough estimation and it’s a quick and dirty check but nevertheless an effective benchmarking tool and can be pretty effective at analysing your content’s message. Why use a word cloud? 1. Language / jargon benchmarking This is a super simple way for you to see the common language of the tools. For example, if everyone says ‘customer’ then we say ‘customer’ as it is the word that is expected by the user. It’s common language and you can’t ignore that. It helps you quickly onboard with expected terms and vocabulary. I’ll give you two examples that I’ve used, ourselves and Marketo that I got from TagCrowd (www.tagcrowd.com): Here is the 7Sheep word cloud: Here is the Marketo cloud: 2.¬†Getting the message across A very quick analysis of our word cloud also shows where we need to work on content on the site. Broadly we’re using similar language, although it’s clear that we have some work to do as although we’re saying *what* we do and broadly speaking to *whom* we are possibly not communicating the *benefits* of 7Sheep as well as we might be based on frequency of words alone. We’re also a simple tool to use – and simple is very small on our word cloud. I’m going to go back over the site and see where we are not getting our message over enough in order to differentiate ourselves in the market....

Case Study: The Barzani Charity Foundation

I spent a wonderful day last Sunday at the Barzani Charity Foundation headquarters, helping them to implement a new contact database and volunteer database to set up their marketing campaigns. Thanks to Peri-Khan Aqrawi-Whitcomb for agreeing to have a small interview on their work and how they are using 7Sheep. Thank you for agreeing to take part in the interview. Would you give us a short background on the Barzani Charity Foundation (BCF) and the work that you do? BCF is a local non-profit organisation that provides inclusive social, cultural and humanitarian aid to the people of Kurdistan and the region since 2005. I have been volunteering for the foundation since October, 2013, with the beginning of the Syrian Refugee Crisis and advise them on various issues regarding UN reporting standards, communication & advocacy, fundraising and organisational management. As an organisation the sheer amounts of tasks, challenges and mandate must have changed hugely over the past 18 months given the changing situation here in Kurdistan, North Iraq. How have you been able to respond so quickly? The good thing is, that being a local NGO, with a large network, but yet a small bureaucratic apparatus, BCF is very capable of responding fast in emergencies. That also has been our biggest strength in dealing with the large and sudden refugee & IDP (internally displaced person) influx. When in August 2013, 60 thousand refugees, crossed the Peshkhabur border into the KRG (Kurdistan Regional Government), in only 3 days. It was the BCF that received them with basic food and water. BCF has grown to be the most important local NGO and...

A new threat to the safe harbour agreement

Reading this article on the ars technica site on July 14th worried us. The headline alone ‘Obama Administration says the world’s servers are ours’ raised our hackles. But, perhaps it is being overly scaremongering. Sadly, not so. It also serves to totally undermine the already fragile data safety net for Europeans that the Safe Harbor Agreement still has. It centres around a legal wrangle between Microsoft and the US Government, who are insisting that Microsoft must hand over e-mail stored in Dublin, Ireland. The case is revolving around accessing information with regard to another case involving Drug Trafficking but the implications are far wider. As noted in the article, the Irish Supreme Court have cited the Mutual Legal Assistance Treaty as the method which could be used by the US to access information stored on servers within the EU. The Bilateral treaty, which entered into force in 2010, places limitations on use to protect personal and other data (Article 9) but within the context of a criminal investigation the obligations of assistance are clear. It will be interesting to watch how this case unfolds. If it does not go in Microsoft’s favour the implications of US government reach into personal data stored within the EU will only further undermine, or indeed shoot stone dead, the current Safe Harbour Agreement which after the NSA scandal is only just clinging...